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Nicodemus

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happy Sequential Second [Apr. 5th, 2006|01:01 pm]
Nicodemus
1:02:03 04/05/06

(Unless you insist on using military time, in which case it was 12 hours ago)
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: rakhan
2006-04-05 08:14 pm (UTC)
Err.. 05/04/06 ;)
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[User Picture]From: arrowtwolf
2006-04-05 10:15 pm (UTC)
Feh, you crazy non-Americans! Fine, you'll just have to wait for yours on May 4th. ;P
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[User Picture]From: harlequeen
2006-04-05 08:47 pm (UTC)
Hmm, that'd be next month....

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[User Picture]From: nicodemusrat
2006-04-05 09:53 pm (UTC)
I know. Damn non-standard date formatting.

That's why I normally write "5 Apr 06" to avoid ambiguity. But it somewhat detracts from today's numerical niftiness. :)
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[User Picture]From: rakhan
2006-04-05 10:02 pm (UTC)
I'm not sure why there is a difference.. I shall ask google!
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[User Picture]From: nicodemusrat
2006-04-05 10:08 pm (UTC)
Now that you mention it... I have no idea, either!
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[User Picture]From: kinkyturtle
2006-04-06 03:49 am (UTC)
It probably derives from whether your ancestors said "the fifth of April" or "April fifth".

Of course, the international standard for writing dates, ISO 8601, is YYYY-MM-DD, for example 2006-04-05, which kinda messes that up a bit. ISO 8601 is cool, though, because it means alphanumeric order matches chronological order.
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[User Picture]From: furahi
2006-04-06 01:17 am (UTC)
I was about to say what Rakhan already said

So instead I'll just say I do use military time ^oo^
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[User Picture]From: pippinbear
2006-04-08 10:13 pm (UTC)
I've never quite worked out why some parts of the world call the 24-hour clock "military" time. Sure, the military use it, but it's not theirs exclusively. Over in Europe the 24-hour clock is used exclusively in several countries at least, while here in the UK it's pretty common and is used, for example, in most transport timetables (bus, train, etc) although not in normal speech like it is in Europe -- but I've never heard anyone other than Americans link it with the military...
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[User Picture]From: furahi
2006-04-09 03:10 am (UTC)
Indeed, it's not called military time here either but 24 hour time
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[User Picture]From: nicodemusrat
2006-04-11 09:44 pm (UTC)
My guess is that it is an American thing (per Pippin's comment). I suspect it's called that here because almost no one uses it except the military (who use it compulsively).
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[User Picture]From: patch_bunny
2006-04-06 04:55 am (UTC)
Don't forget this June:

06:06:06, 06/06/06

Naturally, there's another Satan movie being released this year. :)
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[User Picture]From: 3catsjackson
2006-04-06 08:00 am (UTC)
Personally, I'm a big enough fan of ISO 8601 to observe this next month: 2006-05-04T03:02:01
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[User Picture]From: kiltbear
2006-04-06 02:41 pm (UTC)
Amen!!! My biggest problem with this is that the orders of magnitude were all out of order. Harrumph... but being the enlightened Amurican that I am, my first reaction was "Not it Europe it ain't"...

We silly ass humans will find a pattern in Anything!!!
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[User Picture]From: furahi
2006-04-09 03:11 am (UTC)
Indeed, if it was that easy for computers to find patters my thesis woud've been finished months ago x.x
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